Whale Watching Statistics and Charts

Based on our Whale Watching sightings, by whale or dolphin species.

Pick the species you are interested in, then choose between two available views:

  1. Sighting frequency (default option)

    For each month, it is the proportion between the number of trips in which the species was sighted and the total number of trips that were run.

  2. Absolute number of sightings

    For each month, it is the absolute number of trips in which the species was sighted.
    In months where we run more trips (e.g. in the summer), this option may give you the illusion that a species is sighted more frequently than it is in reality.

     
Scientific name

Eubalaena glacialis

  • Common Name: North Atlantic right whale
  • Suborder: Mysticeti
  • Family: Balaenidae
  • Has Dorsal Fin? No
  • Minimum Adult Length: 11.00 m
  • Maximum Adult Length: 18.00 m
  • Minimum Adult Weight: 30.00 t
  • Maximum Adult Weight: 80.00 t
  • Which Hemisphere? North

Related resources

Read post

The Right whale to save (not to kill!)

An update on the species status from the time when, back in 2009, we were gifted with a sighting of a North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) in Pico.
Live Updates

by CW Azores

  • Welcome to the CW Azores Live dashboard!
  • Here you will see real-time whale and dolphin 🐳🐬 sighting updates from our boats, along with other interesting insights 😉
  • Using environmental DNA (eDNA) to monitor biodiversity in the North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean. CW Azores is an official partner of the project. Learn more...
  • LIVE TOUR
    Our boat Kometa left port at 2024-7-19 1:33 PM (UTC Time) for a Whale Watching tour.
    Species seen so far:
    Atlantic spotted dolphin
    Sei whale
    The Live button will pulse each time a new sighting is recorded by our crew.
  • LIVE TOUR
    Our boat BWA left port at 2024-7-19 1:56 PM (UTC Time) for a Swim with Dolphins tour.
    Species seen so far:
    Atlantic spotted dolphin
    Common bottlenose dolphin
    The Live button will pulse each time a new sighting is recorded by our crew.